Center for Teaching and Learning

April 2, 2020

20 – Encouraging Interactive Teaching Using Structured Feedback

Authors

  • Alissa Hemke, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, UW Seattle
  • Thomas Soeprono, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, UW Seattle
  • Douglas Russell,Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, UW Seattle

Abstract

Topic: We sought to improve interactivity and other evidence-based teaching principles in lectures through implementation of a structured feedback form. The form prompts learners to evaluate learning objectives, relevancy, checks on understanding, variation, and multisensory learning. Before implementing the form, we conducted interactive presentations with faculty and learners (summarized in a Youtube video) covering the underlying educational theory. Our goals were to improve instructors’ teaching effectiveness, and to strengthen learners’ skills as future educators.

Context: A weekly lecture series in a medical residency program, typically to groups of 12 residents (physicians in training). Instructors are effectively guest lecturers, teaching a few times per year. Most have minimal training in educational techniques, and teach primarily via passive, PowerPoint-focused lectures. Developing skills as an educator is important for residents as well, as most physicians teach in some capacity.

Scholarly basis: This project was informed initially by residents’ concerns about difficulty retaining information, trouble identifying key points, and feeling disengaged during passive lectures. We created our materials based on user feedback, published literature, and consultation with the Center for Teaching and Learning.

Results: Learners and particularly instructors voiced appreciation of the interactive presentation on learning theory. Since the feedback form has been in use, presenters have noted a qualitative difference in the feedback given, with more specific, actionable responses. We are now beginning to formally survey faculty and learners, and will report results in our poster.

Application: Feedback and reflection is often an overlooked part of the educational process from both educators’ and learners’ perspectives. Our approach can be applied in any context where instructors have limited background in how to teach effectively. Copies of the feedback form and youtube video will be made available, and the interactive presentation can be based on the Youtube video and expanded to include learner interaction.

View a PDF of this poster

Video presentation

 


Q & A: Poster session 2 (3:45 – 4:30 p.m.)