Center for Teaching and Learning

Advances in Higher Education Research Seminar

This seminar series highlights original research in college-level learning and instruction. Multidisciplinary in scope, each seminar addresses the broad themes of our work as instructors, including the cognitive processes by which students learn, and the classroom context in which they do so.

All seminars are free and open to the public. Presentations will be followed by a Q&A session and opportunities for discussion.

Spring quarter seminar

An Environment for Learning: Leveraging Instructional Expertise to Support Remote Teaching

Monday, May 17 (4:00-4:50 p.m.) Zoom

The rapid shift to remote teaching due to the pandemic has been destabilizing to all members of the UW community, and the coincident social and political unrest has only added further tumult to a fraught teaching and learning environment. Helping faculty, teaching assistants, and students navigate this new instructional paradigm has become a principal focus of all teaching units at our institution.

In the UW College of the Environment, Jane Dolliver, Tim Essington, José Guzmán, Kat Huybers, Kerry Naish, Mikelle Nuwer, Julia Parrish, and Kristi Straus responded to the moment by forming the “Online Teaching Team” (OLT). OLT supports faculty and TAs across the college in adapting to the demands of remote instruction. Signal contributions of OLT include:

  • Evidence-based workshops on effective teaching and technology use
  • Creation of lightboard studios and training in their use
  • All-college TA workshops
  • One-pager “tips” development for momentous and controversial events (e.g., the U.S. capitol insurrection; day of the presidential election)
  • Weekly online teaching “office hours” and “think tanks”

In this panel discussion, OLT members Tim Essington, José Guzmán, Kat Huybers, Kerry Naish, Mikelle Nuwer, and Kristi Straus will describe the group’s work and how their broad expertise in pedagogy and in the diverse range of fields represented in the College of the Environment gives them the credibility to make a difference.

Panelists

Timothy Essington, professor, Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences; and director of the Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management (QERM)Timothy Essington is a professor of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences and the director of the Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management (QERM) interdisciplinary graduate program. Prof. Essington studies marine food webs and the effects that humans have on them. His research focus spans many areas — climate change, ocean acidification, and fisheries — to better understand how these change marine life.


Jose Guzman, assistant teaching professor, Aquatic and Fisheries SciencesJosé Guzmán is an assistant teaching professor of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, and recipient of the 2019 UW Distinguished Teaching Award. Prof. Guzman is passionate about effective teaching, and the science behind it. He develops specific pedagogical strategies to promote flexibility, accessibility, cultural diversity and higher-order thinking in his courses, and evaluates how these practices impact the academic achievement in non-traditional students.


Kat Huybers, lecturer, Department of Atmospheric SciencesKat Huybers is a lecturer in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences. She teaches 100 and 200-level classes on climate change, which are geared toward non-majors. In these classes, students explore the underlying physical principles that determine Earth’s climate, how and why the climate can shift, and the observed and potential impacts of climate change. In partnership with UW’s Earth Lab, Kat also works with K-12 teachers across Washington State to develop climate curriculum in their classrooms.


Kerry-Ann Naish, professor of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, and director of UW Marine Biology programKerry-Ann Naish is a professor of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences and the director of UW Marine Biology program. As an evolutionary geneticist, she uses genetic approaches to characterize the fitness of fish populations given their structure (i.e., is the population small or large?), and also to see how humans influence the evolution of certain traits.


Mikelle Nuwer, associate teaching professor, School of OceanographyMikelle Nuwer is an associate teaching professor in the School of Oceanography, where she introduces more than 600 students a year to the field of marine sciences at UW. Specifically, her classes look at the geologic history of the Pacific Northwest, the physics and chemistry of coastal waters, and marine food webs and ecology. Prof. Nuwer is also a founding member of the Evidence-Based Teaching Program, for which she later served as a faculty coach and program lead.


Kristi Straus, associate teaching professor, Program on the EnvironmentKristi Straus is an associate teaching professor in the Program on the Environment and recipient of the 2017 UW Distinguished Teaching Award. She is passionate about environmental conservation and effective teaching of environmental topics for students of all ages. Prof. Straus is also a founding member of the Evidence-Based Teaching Program, for which she later served as a faculty coach and program lead.


Questions about the series?

Email aher@uw.edu